Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

Association for Contextual Behavioral Science

Association for Contextual Behavioral Science

Program Type

Treatment/Services

Cost

Yes, under $500

Evidence Type

Empirically Defined Evidence

Strategy

Identify and support people at risk

Program or Intervention Summary

ACT is a contextually focused form of cognitive behavioral psychotherapy that uses mindfulness and behavioral activation to increase a client’s psychological flexibilityā€”their ability to engage in values-based, positive behaviors while experiencing difficult thoughts, emotions, or sensations. ACT establishes this through six core processes: Acceptance of private experiences; cognitive defusion (i.e., alter the undesirable functions of thoughts and other private events); being present, a perspective-taking sense of self; identification of values; and commitment to action. The first four processes define the ACT approach to mindfulness, and the last two define the ACT approach to behavioral activation. ACT is delivered to clients in one-on-one sessions, in small groups or larger workshops, or in books or other media, through the presentation of information, dialogue, and the use of metaphors, visualization exercises, and behavioral homework. The number, frequency, and length of the sessions and overall duration of the intervention can vary depending on the needs of the client or treatment provider.

Program or Intervention Summary

ACT is a contextually focused form of cognitive behavioral psychotherapy that uses mindfulness and behavioral activation to increase a client’s psychological flexibilityā€”their ability to engage in values-based, positive behaviors while experiencing difficult thoughts, emotions, or sensations. ACT establishes this through six core processes: Acceptance of private experiences; cognitive defusion (i.e., alter the undesirable functions of thoughts and other private events); being present, a perspective-taking sense of self; identification of values; and commitment to action. The first four processes define the ACT approach to mindfulness, and the last two define the ACT approach to behavioral activation. ACT is delivered to clients in one-on-one sessions, in small groups or larger workshops, or in books or other media, through the presentation of information, dialogue, and the use of metaphors, visualization exercises, and behavioral homework. The number, frequency, and length of the sessions and overall duration of the intervention can vary depending on the needs of the client or treatment provider.

Type Treatment/Services
Setting Health care facility, Mental health facility, Residential facility
People Children (5 to 11 years), Adolescents (12 to 17 years), Young Adults (18 to 25 years), Mature Adults (26 to 64 years), Older Adults (65+ years), White, Black or African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian-American, Pacific Islander, Hispanic or Latino, Multi-racial, Women, Men, Military veterans, Low income, People with physical health problems or disabilities, People in particular occupations, Other
Prevention Level Treatment Care
Languages English, Spanish, Chinese, French, Korean, German, Other
Study Method Quantitative
Implementer Requirement Mental health providers
Training Requirement Yes
Delivery Options In person
Topics Reduce risk factors, Promote protective factors

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